Today’s featured photo of the day! October’s feature is: Fall Color/Landscapes

Here is today’s featured photo. For the month of October I am featuring fall color and landscapes photography as the style. For today, I am posting two nice fall photos of a particular colorful tree in the Tinley Creek Woods in the Cook County forest preserves in Illinois. The zoom level changes the photo wonderfully! Date – October 1981.

Tinley Creek 7-75mm__Konica Color

Photo #1 taken with a Nikon EM camera through a Vivitar 70-150 zoom lens zoomed in at 75 mm, filter=polarizer, Aperture=3.8 f/stop, shutter-speed 1/250th second, loaded with Konica ISO (ASA) 100 Color 135-20 Negative Film processed with C-41 Processing Chemicals, and a Type C Print using the RA-4 enlargement paper process, onto a 4X6″ semi-gloss print.

Tinley Creek 7-150mm__Konica Color

Photo #2 taken moments later with a Nikon EM camera through a Vivitar 70-150 zoom lens zoomed in at 150 mm , filter=polarizer, Aperture=3.8 f/stop, shutter-speed 1/250th second, loaded with Konica ISO (ASA) 100 Color 135-20 Negative Film processed with C-41 Processing Chemicals, and a Type C Print using the RA-4 enlargement paper process, onto a 4X6″ semi-gloss print. Notice the background is blurred almost exactly in both photos. Attention must be matched while the focus is shifted, because at both zooms, the area of focus must match–or the photos will vary to the point where they even look like they were taken in a different place or on a different day. If you are looking for that effect, that can be a winner–while if you like a different zoom that looks similar, it can yield with devastating results.

TIP:  Depth of field is a great tool to shift focus of any photo onto one or more objects in a photo. While a evenly focused photo can be great, a photo where you select one area to be the focus can be truly distinctive. Working with depth of field, the actual raw feed does not exactly reflect what the photo’s outcome will be. Generally, the more light coming through the lens, or wider opening/lower numbered aperture, the less depth of field there will be in the outcome. Working at first with this, I suggest taking several shots so that you are not in a position of coming out with your intended subjects being in a blurred zone. Proofreading in digital can be time consuming and while looking at what you just shot, meanwhile, the time you need to actually take more shots is passing. Take more shots, less in-field proofreading. You can always toss unwanted shots in the trash.

Enjoy, and see you tomorrow with another fine fall color and/or landscape photograph!!

PHOTO OF THE DAY

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